Japanese Gentleman`s Agreement 1907

Victor Metcalf, Minister of Trade and Labour, was sent to investigate the problem and force the repeal of the policy. He did not succeed because local officials wanted Japan to be excluded. Roosevelt tried to put pressure on the school, but she would not give in. On February 15, 1907, the parties reached a compromise. If Roosevelt could guarantee the suspension of Japanese immigration, the school administration would allow Japanese-American students to attend public schools. The Japanese government did not want to harm its national pride or suffer humiliation, as the Qing government in China did in 1882 by the Chinase Exclusion Act. The Japanese government agreed to no longer grant passports to workers attempting to enter the United States unless they came to occupy a formerly acquired house to join a relative; spouse; or to take active control of a previously acquired agricultural holding. [10] The Gentlemen`s Agreement of 1907 (1907) was an informal agreement between the United States of America and the Japanese Empire, according to which the United States would not impose restrictions on Japanese immigration and Japan would not allow emigration to the United States. The aim was to ease tensions between the two Pacific nations. The agreement was never ratified by the U.S. Congress and replaced by the Immigration Act of 1924. On April 18, 4, 1906, the San Francisco, California Board of Education separated all students of Japanese origin from the Oriental Public School for Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans.

Japanese-Americans were outraged by what they saw as a breach of the 1894 treaty, which had guaranteed them the right to immigration. When the problem accelerated, japanese and U.S. authorities intervened to maintain diplomatic peace. The 1907 Gentleman`s Agreement collection in DIVA brings together primary source documents, including telegrams, letters, and confidential memos from 1906 to 1908, which detail the discussions of Theodoore Roosevelt, Elihu Root, Kazuo Matsubara, and others. Newspaper clippings and magazine articles in the United States and Japan show the real impact of their decisions. . . .